Chancellor
of Regent’s

Lord Dr Michael Hastings of Scarisbrick CBE is the second Chancellor of Regent’s University London. He was installed on 21 February 2017, upon the retirement of the first Chancellor, Professor John Drew.

Dr Hastings is the Global Head of Citizenship for KPMG International. Dr Hastings began his career as a teacher, before moving into government service. He was the BBC’s head of Public Affairs and its first head of Corporate Social Responsibility. He is a trustee of the Vodafone Group Foundation and a vice president of UNICEF and Tearfund. He is also a patron of Free the Children and a director of Junior Achievement Worldwide.

In January 2003, Lord Hastings was awarded a CBE in recognition of his services to crime reduction, including 15 years as chairman of Crime Concern and 21 as a Trustee. He served on the Commission for Racial Equality for nine years as a Commissioner.

In 2003, Lord Hastings was awarded a CBE (Commander of the British Empire) for services to crime reduction and in 2005 was awarded an independent peerage to the House of Lords. In the same year, he received the UNICEF Award for his outstanding contribution to understanding and effecting solutions for Africa’s children.

In 2014, he was conferred with a Doctorate in Civil Law from the University of Kent, Canterbury in recognition for his leadership at KPMG, the BBC and for his work in international development and corporate responsibility. He was listed as number six on the 2016 list of 100 Black British Business Leaders.

Upon his installation, Lord Hastings said he hoped to inject a whole new area of enthusiasm and energy into a university that was already well established. ‘It is a big honour to be the second chancellor of Regent’s,’ he said, ‘Those who have gone before have built great foundations.’

‘I hope that the students who come to our university, who come from every corner of the world, get a deep sense of vision and mission about their lives. And when they pursue business opportunities, leadership opportunities and intuitional opportunities, they do so from the basis of being men and women of character and distinction and of identity and of inclusive commitment.

‘We want those who go from our university to say, “That is where I learned to give myself away.”’