psychology

Liberal Arts (Psychology)

BA (Hons)

Programme details

  • Next start date: Jan 2022
  • Future start date: Sep 2022
  • Study: Full-time
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Fee: £18,500
  • UCAS code: LS17
  • Study abroad: Optional

Overview

For January 2022 entry, this course is titled BA (Hons) Liberal Studies (Psychology). All other course details remain the same.

Study a degree that’s tailor-made for you.  

A liberal arts degree gives you the freedom to focus on the subjects that most interest you. You’ll concentrate on a major area of study while maintaining a breadth of learning spanning the arts, humanities and social sciences.  

The Psychology Major

The Psychology Major offers an in-depth examination of the scientific approach to human behaviour and experience.  

You will focus on core principles of psychology, covering topics such as sexuality, cultural differences and evolution. You’ll also learn how psychology applies to fields such as marketing, forensics, sport and fashion.  

You’ll have opportunities to undertake practical experiments using our specialist facilities. Your research findings will inform your understanding of different scientific theories and methodologies.  

Elective modules will help you understand the breadth of this discipline and also give you a broad skillset.   

Options to learn a language and study abroad at one of our international partners will help expand your learning and global outlook.   

This Major offers the perfect foundation if you are considering pursuing a professional career in psychology. It will also equip you with the transferable skills to work in fields such as education, social services, marketing, advertising and human resources.  

 

Download the Programme Specification

Structure

Undertake a three-year full-time programme, in which you’ll combine your major with a selection of subjects that reflect your interests. It features four elements: 

  • A major area of specialisation 
  • An optional minor 
  • Several core modules 
  • A wide selection of elective modules 

You will be required to combine your specialist modules with five elective modules in other subjects in Years 1 and 2, and three in Year 3.  

You’ll also take part in three core Liberal Arts modules (Leadership and Liberal Learning, Effective Research, Capstone) and one Global Perspectives module that facilitates interpersonal, intercultural, cross-disciplinary learning, increasing self-awareness and a sense of global citizenship. Topics include employability, equality, entrepreneurship, diversity and sustainability. 

Study abroad

In addition to studying in the heart of London, you’ll have the chance to study abroad for a term in your second year – replacing the second term of your Regent’s degree.  

This provides you with the unique opportunity to explore a diverse range of topics offered by other institutions and gain international experience. 

Year 1 (Core Modules)

Module Title Overview
Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology The module focuses on the historical and philosophical context in which psychology developed as an academic discipline. You will be introduced to early psychological thought, from ancient times through to the scientific revolution and beyond. The influence of prominent philosophers, physicians and physiologists throughout the ages will be discussed. Moreover, the module will cover the key individuals and events that contributed to each of the major schools of thought in 20th century psychology. You will be encouraged to engage in critical evaluation of the main

theories, assumptions and methods of each of these schools of thought. Throughout the

module, a range of conceptual and philosophical areas of debate will be considered. Finally, you will engage with contemporary issues and controversies in psychology and consider

the ways in which psychology might progress in the future.

PSL411
Developmental Psychology This module provides an overview of the psychology of human development, including

child and adult cognitive, social and emotional development. It will take a chronological perspective and explore development from conception through to the school years, into adolescence and early adulthood. It will then explore development further throughout the lifespan, into adulthood, middle and old age. It will focus on the development of the brain, cognitive abilities, social skills, gender and identity and emotional development. This module builds on the approaches and models in psychology covered in the Introducing Psychology module.

PSL413
Global Perspectives This University-wide common module facilitates interpersonal, intercultural and

trans-disciplinary learning for all level 4 students. The module introduces a range of ideas and ways of thinking based around the University’s values. It will encourage you to interact with the broader University community, both socially and academically, asking you to cross the physical and intellectual borders of your degree. Global Perspectives aims to increase self-awareness and a sense of global citizenship, preparing you for your subsequent studies.
Introduction to Psychology This module will introduce you to the many branches within this field. You will cover a number of topics from these subdisciplines, including cognitive, biological developmental, social, health and abnormal psychology, and the study of individual differences. Topics that are discussed are, for example, motivation, brain damage and its impact on behaviour, social development and personality. Although, these topics are typically discussed within the subdisciplines, we will make links between the different areas throughout the module and thus provide a general introduction to the overall field of psychology.

PSL410
Liberal Arts Seminar – Leadership and Liberal Learning The purpose of this core module is to help you build awareness and develop potential leadership capacity through engagement with the curriculum. Taking an integrated approach, this module focuses on four interdependent fundamental competencies: critical thinking, communication, cross-cultural understanding and the development of ethical capacity.
Personality and Individual Differences This module focuses on two essential components of the discipline of psychology: personality and individual differences. The module will describe, evaluate, and give a flavor of some of the debate surrounding personality theory. It will consider what personality is, and will present all major personality theories from the views of the Ancient Greeks to psychoanalytic

theory to trait theory, with a focus on the currently most-widely accepted model: the Big Five.

The module also considers some of the important variables that can affect behaviour, particularly intelligence. In the module, you will examine the nature of intelligence, intelligence theories and the biological and genetic basis of intelligence in detail. It will also discuss other individual differences and research on how these individual differences play a role in shaping people’s behaviours.

For students starting in January 2022, this module is called Personality and Individual Differences. For students starting in September 2022 or later, this module is called Personality Psychology.

PSL412
Four elective modules  You will select a number of elective modules from subjects that fall outside the remit of your major. These include: Business and management, literature and creative writing, history, international relations, journalism, media and communications, political science, psychology and public relations.

Year 2 (Core Modules)

Module Title Overview
Biological and Cognitive Psychology This module will introduce you to the key aspects of two of the largest, oldest and most important branches in psychology: biological and cognitive psychology. Biological psychology is the study of the body in relation to behaviour, primarily (although not exclusively) the study of the brain and the nervous system. Cognitive psychology is the study of mental life, memory and decision making and involves the study of perception, attention, memory. and making decisions and judgments. You will learn basic brain anatomy and key psychological theories that underpin our understanding of cognitive processes. By the end of the module, you will understand the basic and advanced aspects of the study of the biological basis of behaviour and the study of how and why we think and make the decisions we do.

PSL514
Evolutionary Psychology The module provides an introduction to a relatively new branch of psychology concerned with Darwin’s evolutionary theories of natural and sexual selection. It considers how evolution has organised the human brain and how the behaviour of animals and humans are shaped by the same evolutionary forces. It also considers how culture originates and cultural differences emerge. In addition, the module provides evolutionary explanations for the cognition and behaviours associated with such phenomena as mating, emotion, language, physical aggression.

PSL511
Liberal Arts Seminar – Effective Research This module addresses the fundamentals of academic research, its aims and ethics. It

will teach you how to use established research methodologies and engage critically with sources in order to interpret research discoveries. You will be introduced to various forms of academic research and their practical application in both the humanities and social sciences. These will include the handling of historical sources, interviews, surveys/questionnaires and content analysis.

Methods and Statistics in Psychology This module aims to give you the necessary basic skills and knowledge to engage in elementary research methods and statistical analysis. The module will introduce you to the scientific method, ethics in psychology, statistical terminology and reasoning. It will train you to report laboratory findings and also introduce you to statistical software.

For students starting in January 2022, this module is called Methods and Statistics in Psychology. For students starting in September 2022 or later, this module is called Research Methods and Statistics in Psychology.

PSL512
Psychopathology This module aims to provide an understanding of the characteristics, classification, biological,

psychological and social causes and treatments associated with a range of psychological disorders. The first part of module will introduce you to psychopathology. You will discuss the general theoretical perspectives as well as the issues related to assessment and diagnosis. Thereafter, the module aims to take a critical approach to describing and evaluating the diagnostic criteria, prognosis and treatment models and outcomes for anxiety disorders including phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, eating disorders, mood disorders including major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

PSL510
Social Psychology The field of psychology aims to understand and predict individual behaviour. Social Psychology specifically focuses on how social and environmental factors influence the individual’s (and the group’s) behaviour. This module will focus on the social impact on the individual’s behaviour, thoughts, preferences, and perception of self. Social psychology is one of the main schools in psychology and this module will inform your understanding of other modules on the programme.

PSL513
Four elective modules  You will select a number of elective modules from subjects that fall outside the remit of your major. These include: Business and management, literature and creative writing, history, international relations, journalism, media and communications, political science, psychology and public relations.

Year 3 (Core Modules)

Module Title Overview
Applied Psychologies This module introduces you to the fundamental concepts and issues in applied psychology. To ensure the module is up-to-date, responsive to student needs, and capitalises on the experience and expertise of staff, the module will offer introductions to a range of applied areas, which will vary. One focus of the module will be on psychology of sport, expertise and performance in the

widest sense. You will be introduced to various important general and specific concepts in applied psychology ranging from motivation through to the psychology of the

audience experience. You will also learn about the psychology of film and theatre performance as well as performance in sport.

PSL612
Cross-cultural Psychology This module introduces you to the psychological processes in which cross-cultural variations have been observed, in addition to the variety of methodologies employed in uncovering them. You will gain an understanding of the issues related to universality and cultural variability in behaviour, perception and emotion. This module will encourage you to challenge accepted ethnocentric explanations, interpretations, classifications and versions of human behaviour and expression.

PSL610
Forensic Psychology Forensic psychology is the application of psychological knowledge within the context of crime, law, justice system, offenders and victims. This module introduces the theoretical and empirical knowledge in understanding and predicting antisocial behaviour and decisions linked to it. Furthermore, it will explore the role of the psychologist within the justice context. You will then apply this psychological knowledge to develop a deeper understanding within the current psychological topics in the context of crime and law.

PSL613
Sexuality and Gender Sexuality and gender are intrinsic to almost everything, even if it isn’t always explicit. From

issues around transgender and orientation to legal matters relating to discrimination and

equal pay, whether female roles in horror films or the representation of romance on ‘Love

Island’ - sex, sexuality and gender are relevant to all aspects of life. This module builds on the areas from social, developmental and biological psychology. The aim of the module is to facilitate a familiarity and understanding of biological and psycho-social gender and identity, as well as to examine theories and different approaches to sexuality, intimate relationships and behaviours and motivations across social groups, age groups and cultures. You will engage with issues such as gender transition, homophobia, sexism, sex workers and risk taking, safe sex and abstinence campaigns as well as sex education. Other likely focus areas are hetero-centrism, paraphilias /fetish, erotomania and pornography. The module will also examine the use of sex in advertising and what has been called the ”pornification” of urban space through imagery and the media.

PSL611
The Liberal Arts Capstone (Dissertation)  The purpose of this module is to bring together the breadth of your learning and experience to bear on a major project. The Capstone runs over two semesters and can take the form of either a reflective practice-based project or a traditional written dissertation. It will be supervised by one or two academics depending on the nature of the project.
Three elective modules You will select a number of elective modules from subjects that fall outside the remit of your major. These include: Business and management, literature and creative writing, history, international relations, journalism, media and communications, political science, psychology and public relations.

How to apply

Applying to study at Regent's University London is quick and easy. We have put together some helpful information to guide you through the process. We accept direct applications and there is no application fee.

Not received your results yet?

That's fine, you can still apply even without your exam results. We can issue a conditional offer without your results. You just need be clear in your application which qualifications you are currently studying for.

There's still time to submit an application. Get in touch, we'd love to hear from you.

Step 1: Apply

You can apply in the following ways:

  • Apply through our website
  • Apply through UCAS  (The Regent’s UCAS code is R18)

If you have not uploaded the relevant supporting documents during the online application process, you should ensure that we have the below supporting documents as soon as you have completed your application. These can be sent to the Regent’s Admissions Department via email to [email protected].

  • Copies of academic transcripts and certificates from all previous studies (i.e. secondary school and/or university certificates)
  • One academic letter of recommendation
  • A 300-500 word personal statement outlining the reasons for applying to your chosen programme, how you feel you will benefit from the programme of study, what contributions you will make to the University and how this will help your future career aspirations
  • A copy of your passport photograph (ID) page
  • If you are not a native English speaker, proof of your English proficiency

Credit Transfer

  • If you’ve already studied part of a degree course elsewhere, you may be able apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and join the programme at an advanced entry point. If you’d like to request entry part-way through a programme, make sure you state this clearly in your statement of purpose and provide us with the transcripts and module descriptions for the relevant study.

 Step 2: Receive a response to your application

You can expect to receive a decision on your application within 10 working days of receipt of your completed application and supporting documents.

We will assess whether you meet our entry requirements and will notify you of the decision via email. UCAS applicants will also receive official notification via the UCAS system.

For some of our programmes, the selection process may include an interview or audition. Interviews/auditions can take the form of a one-to-one interview, group interview or portfolio review which may be conducted by telephone or as a Skype call. Arrangements of these are made between the Admissions Department and the applicant.

Step 3: Accepting your offer

If you wish to accept the offer you must pay the advance tuition fee deposit (non-refundable) to confirm your place.

Please see here for information on how to pay.

Step 4: After you have accepted your place

Closer to the start of the term, the Admissions Team will send information regarding the registration process. This will include information on completing your online enrolment prior to your arrival as well as a checklist of documents you will need to bring with you to fully register onto the programme.

Information for international students

If you are an overseas student requiring visa sponsorship to study in the UK, our team will be in touch with information on applying for your student visa and the documents you will need. More information can be found on our visas and immigration page.

Scholarships and funding

There are a wide variety of funding and scholarship opportunities to help you finance your studies.

For further information, please visit our scholarships and funding page.

 

Fees

Tuition fees

Annual fee: £18,500

Non-refundable advance deposit

Home/EU students: £1,000

Non-EU students: £4,000

What do fees include?

Fees cover the cost of all tuition and access to the University’s IT infrastructure and library learning resources. Fees are presented for the first level of study which equates to two terms.

What other costs should I budget for?

Fees cover the cost of tuition. You will need to budget additional funds for accommodation and living expenses, travel, and any additional trips, visits, activities or courses that you choose to participate in outside of the tuition offered as part of the programme.

The library hold a limited number of copies of core text books and where possible in e-format. You will be encouraged to purchase your own text books and will need to budget approximately £80-£100 per year, depending on your programme of study.

When are fees paid?

Fees are payable in the following instalments:

  • An initial non-refundable advance deposit paid when you accept your offer of a place
  • The advance deposit is allocated against the first term’s fees
  • Tuition fees (including fees for subsequent terms) are due two weeks in advance of classes commencing

Calculating fee increases

  • The University sets tuition fees on an annual basis in line with the University's financial year which runs from 1 August to 31 July
  • The fees quoted here are for one academic year of study commencing in September
  • For students starting their programme in January the programme spans two separate financial year accounting periods. Fees for the different teaching terms are calculated separately in line with fees charged in each financial year
  • Fees for subsequent years of study are subject to fee inflation
  • The University aims to keep annual fee increases in line with the University’s cost inflation. The expectation is that this will be no greater than UK consumer price inflation (CPI) plus 3%. There are occasionally variations to this dictated by the costs of running specific programmes or facilities required for our programmes
  • All fee increases are subject to approval of the Trustee Board thus ensuring that affordability for our students remains a primary concern in any decisions regarding fee increases

Study Period Abroad (SPA)

Some programmes at Regent’s University London offer an optional or mandatory Study Period Abroad, for one or two semesters. No SPA can be undertaken in the United States.
 
A student who wishes to attend an “ineligible” school, which includes any school in the USA, will forfeit all funding from that semester going forward and all current loans will become due with immediate effect. For any questions regarding these terms and conditions, please email the US Loans Advisor at [email protected]. For questions regarding what an “eligible” or “deferment only” school is, please  email the IPO office, [email protected] or [email protected] before applying for a programme with an SPA module.

Teaching and assessment

As a small university, we centre our teaching around your individual goals – identifying the skills and support you need to thrive. 

Small, interactive classes (of 20 students or less) ensure you’ll have a high level of contact with your tutors, enabling you to develop your individual strengths and interests. 

Teaching staff

Learn from staff who combine strong academic credentials with deep industry experience, offering insights into the latest trends and the chance to apply your learning practically. 

Attend regular guest lectures with industry professionals: networking and developing partnerships with business owners, journalists, curators, scientists, artists, historians – the list goes on. 

Academics are experts in their fields, but they’re also broad thinkers, able to support your learning across other disciplines throughout your study, so you’ll emerge a well-rounded, innovative thinker. 

You’ll also be assigned a personal tutor who’ll help you to build a bespoke programme that reflects your passions and future career. 

Practical learning

Engage in authentic experiences that encourage collaboration and self-expression: learning through hands-on tasks such as debates, discussions, role plays, simulations, group projects and workshops, designed to help you develop skills including critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making. 

Take field trips to business hubs, museums, galleries and labs, and join work placements to put your learning in context – building your professional network and gaining a competitive edge. 

You’ll never learn in silo – everything you study will be connected. You’ll explore topics from a wide range of perspectives, learn to understand the relationships between subjects and start to connect themes and topics across modules.  

Contact hours and expected workload

Contact hours in Year 1 and Year 2 are 15 hours per week. In Year 3, you’ll receive 12-13 hours per week as your final capstone project is a supervised module, rather than a classroom-based one. 

You’ll receive a minimum of 10 hours of one-on-one time with your supervisor, to agree the scope and direction of your capstone project. We also offer research skills lectures and drop-in sessions. 

Assessment

At Regent’s, assessments are designed to consolidate your learning – helping you develop practical skills that’ll be useful in your future career.  

Assessment methods vary according to your major and your combination of elective modules, but could include essays, journals, reports, creative portfolios, group projects, presentations, research papers, online exercises and examinations. 

In your final year you’ll complete a major project that brings together the breadth of your learning, combining the knowledge and skills from your major with thinking from other subject areas.  

The Liberal Arts Capstone can either take the form of a reflective project or a traditional written dissertation and is highly personalised – reflecting your unique mix of modules. 

Disability Support

We welcome and support students with a wide range of disabilities and health concerns. This includes learning difficulties, visual and hearing impairments, mental health difficulties, autism spectrum conditions, mobility difficulties, and temporary or chronic health conditions.

Our dedicated Disability Officer is here to support you. We ask that you speak with Student Registry and our Disability Officer as early as you can to enable us to support you. Find out more about our disability support and contact us.

Entry requirements

Academic requirements

A Regent’s education provides you with a high level of personal attention, and this begins from the moment you apply to study with us. We want to understand who you are and what your skills and interests may be – we are interested in your potential, as well as your prior achievements. We review each application comprehensively and on its individual merit, considering all of your skills, interests and attributes. 

Minimum entry requirements for Level 4 students

One of the following qualifications:

  • Three GCE A-levels at grade A-C
  • International Baccalaureate Diploma
  • A minimum GPA of 2.5 PLUS one of the following:
    - Three AP tests with an average grade of 3 or two AP tests with an average grade of 4
    - Three SAT II (Subject Tests) with a minimum score of 500 in each section or two SAT II with a minimum score of 600 in each section
    - SAT I (Reasoning Tests) with a minimum score of 1800 (600 in each section)
    - ACT with a composite score of 26 (20 in each section)
    - Dual Enrolment and College credits (1st Year) - 30 credits with a GPA of 2.5 or higher.
  • Equivalent qualifications as deemed acceptable by the University

We receive applications each year from over 170 countries and are happy to assess all international qualifications.

English Language requirements 

English is our language of instruction and we require proof of your English proficiency. 

You can demonstrate your English proficiency with:

•    IELTS: Overall score of 6.0 with no score below 5.5 in any of the four components

•    PTE Academic: Overall score of 58, with 51 or above in each individual component

•    TOEFL IBT: Overall score 80. (We do not accept TOEFL from applicants requiring a Tier 4 visa, as this qualification is no longer accepted by the UK Visas and Immigration Department (UKVI)

•    A-level/GCSE/IGCSE English: Grade C / 4 or above (for IGCSE certificates, please provide the Supplementary Certifying Statement with the breakdown of component grades)

•    International Baccalaureate: Grade 4 or above in English at Higher or Standard Level

This list is not exhaustive. We will review the English qualifications you submit as part of your application and be in contact if we require anything further.
For applicants who wish to improve their English language proficiency, please see our English language courses.

Regent's English Proficiency Test (REPT)

We provide an online English diagnostic test known as the Regent’s English Proficiency Test (REPT). This test must be booked in advance. To find out more information and to book a test, please visit the REPT page. The REPT test is currently free of charge.

English for Academic Purposes (EAP)

As a Regent’s student you will take an English for Academic Purposes (EAP) module in your first semester in order to support the development of your academic work in English.

Please note that students who achieve an IELTS 6.5, with a minimum score of 5.5 in each component, or an equivalent result, are exempt from taking the EAP module and have an additional academic module.

Please note this module is no longer running effective from September 2021.

Students entering with Recognition of Prior Learning

If you are joining your programme at an advanced entry point, we require IELTS 6.5 with a minimum 6.0 in Reading and Writing, with no score below 5.5 in any other components.

Careers

You’ll graduate with a wide range of skills valuable in any workplace, including critical thinking, cross-cultural understanding, communication, teamwork and problem-solving – ready to become an engaged, thoughtful and well-informed global leader.  

Industry-active academics and our Graduate Outcomes Team can help to connect you to world-renowned companies, where you’ll build workplace skills and connections you’ll lean on throughout your whole career. 

Liberal Arts alumni have a high rate of employment and occupy various high-profile positions across academia, entrepreneurship, finance, politics, law, management, the arts, marketing, PR, psychology and consultancy. 

Many Liberal Arts graduates also pursue postgraduate study at Regent’s, launch successful enterprises and expand existing family businesses, while making the most of Regent’s lifelong career support and innovative entrepreneurial space. 

Apply now

BA (Hons) Liberal Studies (Psychology)

For entry in January 2022. Anyone starting in January 2022 will graduate from this degree. For future start dates, please see the next box.

BA (Hons) Liberal Arts (Psychology)

For entry in September 2022 and future: updated course title. Anyone starting in September 2022 and future will graduate with this title. All other course details remain the same.

Hear from Alessandra

AChambers1
'Often people assume that psychology majors must want to be a psychiatrist or something similar – but this course applies psychology to areas I would have never thought of, such as fashion or forensics. I’ve found this variation particularly interesting'. Alessandra Chambers, BA (Hons) Liberal Studies (Psychology) student